IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications
8-11 September 2019 // Istanbul, Turkey

Tutorials

Tutorials-at-a-Glance

Sunday Morning, 8 September 2019, 09:00 – 12:30

Sunday Afternoon, 8 September 2019, 14:00 – 17:30

Details

Sunday Morning, 8 September 2019, 09:00 – 12:30

T01. Wi-Fi in the 2020s

Presenter:

  • Evgeny Khorov, IITP RAS, Russia

Abstract: According to the Cisco Visual Networking Index, Wi-Fi is the most popular Internet access technology which serves over half of global traffic. Emerging applications and scenarios bring new challenges related to extremely high data rates, ultra-low latencies and support of a high number of power-limited clients. To save and even to increase its share on the market, Wi-Fi continues to evolve. The next edition of the IEEE 802.11 standard – that is expected in the early 2020s – will include mechanisms to support massive and heterogeneous Internet of Things applications, advanced techniques for multigigabit communications, more flexible QoS provisioning, power management, etc. In 5 years, Wi-Fi technology will provide 40 Gbps connectivity in traditional bands and over 250 Gbps in millimeter bands. Moreover, along with radio frequencies, Wi-Fi will soon implement light communications. Along with the wider bands, the enabler of higher data rates is Massive MIMO. Apart from that, much effort is put to improve spectral efficiency with sophisticated spatial reuse and advanced multiple access techniques. Many ongoing activities are also related to significant reducing power consumption in Wi-Fi networks to make it suitable for battery-powered devices. The most recent ideas are related to providing low-latency communications for AR/VR scenarios as well as V2X communications.

In the tutorial, we consider how promising approaches are implemented in the future Wi-Fi standard, what and why is left beyond the scope of the standard, and how the research community can contribute to maximizing user experience in Wi-Fi networks. We discuss peculiarity of resource allocation in 11ax networks and show how they modify the classical schedulers for wireless networks. We consider how the vision on the interference problem is changed over time and how to manage carrier sensing in dense (or sparse) environments. We demonstrate how non-orthogonal channel access can be implemented in future Wi-Fi devices in a backward-compatible way. Finally, we discuss what else can be optimized in terms of power consumption or Internet of Thighs, and clarify other open issues related to the standard amendments that are currently under development, namely 11ax – 11be, which will come to the mass market in the early 2020s.

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T02. Wireless Networks Design in the Era of Deep Learning: Model-Based, AI-Based, or Both?

Presenters:

  • Alessio Zappone, Paris-Saclay University, France
  • Marco Di Renzo, Paris-Saclay University, France
  • Merouane Debbah, Huawei France R&D, Paris, France

Abstract: Data-driven approaches are not new to wireless communications, but their implementation through deep learning techniques has never been considered in the past, even though deep learning is the most widely used machine learning approach in other fields than wireless communication. This is mainly due to the fact that, unlike other fields of science where theoretical modeling is particularly hard, thus motivating the use of data-driven approaches, wireless communications could always rely on strong mathematical models for system design. However, the situation is rapidly changing, and very recently the use of deep learning has started being envisioned for wireless communications too. The increasing complexity of wireless networks makes it harder and harder to come up with theoretical models that are at the same time accurate and tractable. The rising complexity of 5G and beyond 5G networks is exceeding the modeling and optimization possibilities of standard mathematical tools. Nevertheless, purely data-driven approaches require a huge amount of data to operate, which might be difficult and/or expensive to acquire in practical large-scale scenarios. In this context, the specific field of communication theory presents a major opportunity thanks to the availability of many more theoretical models compared to other fields of science. Indeed, despite being usually inaccurate and/or cumbersome, available communication models still provide important prior information that should be exploited. The aim of this tutorial is to put forth the idea that theoretical modeling and data-driven approaches are not contrasting paradigms, but should be used jointly to get the most out of them.

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T03. Securing IoT & M2M Communications

Presenters:

  • Dr. Rajeev Shorey  TCS Research & Innovation, India; IIT, New Delhi, India
  • Prof. Prashant Pillai  University of Wolverhampton, United Kingdom

Abstract: Connected devices have become critical for industrial and home automation, public works (“smart cities”), vehicular assistance systems, and many other applications where humans are not interacting with the device.  Internet-of-things (IoT) is a term that encompasses such devices, and although they enable many new technical advances – they also present new and interesting challenges in terms of cybersecurity. As has been seen with the recent large-scale attacks on such devices, when IoT devices are remotely commandeered and their communications capabilities abused, the ability to inflict harm on remote endpoints on the Internet becomes difficult to isolate and shut down. This is because, unlike a personal device such as a smartphone or tablet, there are many more IoT products that may or may not have a human observer to detect when there is a compromise. This tutorial will present an overview of the challenges IoT devices present in terms of communications security. When considering the different means by which IoT devices access the internet (physical interfaces, protocols, etc.), a framework for ensuring best security practices is presented. In addition, remote detection of compromised IoT devices is also discussed. The tutorial will present various categories of attack vectors related to IoT and also address mitigation of some of the attacks. Further, the tutorial will present key challenges in securing M2M communications, with an emphasis on Vehicular (V2X) Systems and Industrial IoT Systems. The tutorial will also cover key standards and industry forums in IoT and M2M security.

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T04. How to Prepare the Ground for Drone Communications

Presenters:

  • Giovanni Geraci, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain
  • Adrian Garcia-Rodriguez, Nokia Bell Labs, Ireland
  • Mahdi Azari, KU Leuven, Belgium
  • Lorenzo Galati Giordano, Nokia Bell Labs, Ireland

 Abstract: As we head towards a pervasive digital transformation aiming at more efficient, automated, and flexible processes, a growing number of tasks are being delegated to machines. Drones—a.k.a. UAVs—, the most mobile of them all, are the logical candidates to take over many such missions. What will it take for drones—and the whole associated ecosystem—to take off? Arguably, infallible command and control channels for safe and autonomous flying, and high-throughput links for multi-purpose live video streaming. Meeting these aspirations may entail a full cellular support, provided through 5G-and-beyond hardware and software upgrades by both operators and UAV manufacturers.

Will current cellular networks suffice to meet the demanding UAV communication link requirements? Or should the operators, primarily catering to ground users, implement substantial upgrades? In this one-of-a-kind industrial tutorial, well founded answers to such—and many other—key questions will unfold as we discuss:

  • Outside the classroom: a fresh look at the 3GPP standardization status, field measurements, and exciting videos of UAVs connected to existing cellular networks.
  • Enabling 5G-and-beyond network-connected UAVs through massive MIMO, cell-free, and ultra-dense small cell deployments: lessons learnt and essential guidelines.
  • D2D in the sky, what will it take? Network slicing for UAV-to-UAV communications.

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T05. Massive and Critical MTC for Beyond 5G Systems

Presenters:

  • Hirley Alves, University of Oulu, Finland,
  • Jimmy J. Nielsen, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • Nurul Huda Mahmood, University of Oulu, Finland

 Abstract: Fifth-Generation (5G) cellular networks is designed to respond to the growing demand of multi-service mobile communication. Compared to existing Long Term Evolution (LTE) networks, 5G introduces two new service classes. Ultra-Reliable Low-Latency Communications (URLLC) targets highly reliable communication with very low latencies – mainly geared towards applications in industry 4.0, vehicular networking and emerging use cases like tactile internet. On the other hand massive machine type communication (mMTC) services address the growing Internet of Things (IoT) applications where the network needs to serve a large number of devices with sporadic and small payload traffic. Collectively, these two service classes are also known as critical and massive MTC (cMTC and mMTC). Novel solutions are required to meet the daunting research challenges introduced by MTC, encompassing both of its massive and mission critical aspects. This tutorial aims to equip the participants with a comprehensive overview of MTC and its enabling solutions. The tutorial will open with an introduction of the service classes, present some example use cases and detail the associated research challenges. The second part of the tutorial will cover some of the state of the art solutions proposed to address these research challenges. We will cover both flavours of solutions – industrial ones geared towards the 5G new radio (NR) standard lead by 3GPP, as well as academic approaches. Finally, the tutorial will end with an outlook towards the future – outlining open research questions and proposing novel directions with a vision towards the 6G.

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 Sunday Afternoon, 8 September 2019, 14:00 – 17:30

T06. V2X Communication Technologies for Connected and Automated Vehicles

Presenters:

  • Ali Balador, Västerås, Sweden
  • Alessandro Bazzi, CNR, Italy
  • Claudia Campolo University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Italy
  • Sinem Coleri Ergen, Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey

Abstract: This tutorial will cover the state-of-the-art of vehicular communication and networking, from the theoretical perspective of access technologies/protocols and regulations, as well as through practical examples of the most prominent and challenging automotive applications, such as cooperative intersection control and platooning. IEEE 802.11 and 3GPP Cellular-Vehicle-to-Everything (C-V2X) will be presented as the main competitors in the race towards connected and automated vehicles (CAVs). Standardization activities and recent findings from the literature and instructors’ research will be scanned. The evolutionary path of V2X communication technologies to enable ultra-high reliability and ultra-low latency for challenging automotive use cases will be debated, while emphasizing the need for synergies with ongoing fifth-generation (5G) research efforts (e.g., Millimeter Wave, New Radio), as well as with other technologies, e.g., Visible Light Communications, Full-Duplex techniques. Overall, the tutorial will provide a comprehensive view of how CAVs will fit into the broader 5G landscape.

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T07. Age of Information

Presenters:

  • Yin Sun, Auburn University, USA
  • Elif Uysal, Middle East Technical University, Turkey

Abstract: The freshness of information is of fundamental importance in networked monitoring and control systems (e.g., sensor networks, airplane/vehicular control, robotics networks, Internet-of-Things, and Cyber-Physical Systems) and information-update and data analytics applications (e.g., crowdsourcing, financial trading, social networks, and online learning). The Age of Information (AoI) is a new concept that can serve as a performance metric for characterizing the freshness of information.

Recent research advances in AoI research suggest that many well-known design principles (e.g., for providing high throughput and low delay) that lead to the success of traditional communication networks are inappropriate and need to be re-examined for enhancing information freshness, to enable scalable development of the Internet of Everything. This tutorial will provide an introduction on how to use the AoI concept to improve fundamental communication network functionalities and modules such as sampling, channel coding, scheduling.

We will survey how nonlinear age functions arise in various real-time applications and introduce a unified sampling theory for minimizing nonlinear age functions and estimation error of stochastic signals. We will review the age-energy trade-off when sending status updates from low power devices such as battery-operated or energy harvesting sensor nodes, and principles for getting the freshest data from such devices within given energy constraints. We will consider the recently popularized performance metric Peak-Age Violation Probability for the Ultra-Reliable Low Latency Communication (URLLC) paradigm in 5G networks, and show how it leads to new physical layer design guidelines. We will glimpse new operating points dictated by a freshness objective in diverse systems including multiuser and MIMO links, IoT implementations and TCP/UDP/MQTT connections. We will conclude by highlighting some fundamental research directions opened up by these results.

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T08. Networked-Flying Platforms: Paving the Way Towards Global Wireless Connectivity

Presenters:

  •  Muhammad Zeeshan Shakir, University of the West of Scotland, UK
  • Mohamed-Slim Alouini, KAUST, Saudi Arabia

Abstract: Driven by an emerging use of Networked Flying Platforms (NFPs) such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned balloons in future network applications and the challenges that the 5G and beyond networks exhibit, the focus of this tutorial is to demonstrate the evolution of the NFPs as a novel architectural enabler for radio access network (RAN) and their integration with the future cellular access and backhaul/fronthaul networks. NFPs are networked, flying and a potential way to offer high data rate, high reliability and ultra-low latent access and backhaul/fronthaul to future wireless networks. Such large scale deployable platforms and frameworks will guarantee the global information and communication requirements in future smart and resilient cities and solve the ubiquitous connectivity problems in many challenging network environments, e.g., coverage or capacity enhancements for remote or sparsely populated areas, social gathering and disaster affected scenarios, etc. This tutorial will provide balanced coverage on recent trends, challenges and future research and development on the integration of NFPs with the future wireless networks. Specifically, this tutorial will provide answers for the following:

  • How NFPs can offer a reliable, high data rate and scalable solution to fronthaul the ultra-dense small cell deployment (NFPs deployment architecture, potential high data rate technologies such as optical communications and NFP-small cell association)?
  • How NFPs can enhance capacity and coverage for users and access networks (NFP placement, resource allocation and network and user/network centric approaches)?
  • What are the economic, regulatory and industrial perspectives of deploying NPFs for cellular access and backhaul networks (total cost of operation and some latest regulations)?

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T09. 5G New Radio (NR) Protocols and Architecture

Presenters:

  • Icaro Leonardo Da Silva, Ericsson Research Network, Architecture and Protocols (NAP), Sweden
  • Gunnar Mildh, Ericsson Research Network, Architecture and Protocols (NAP), Sweden
  • Paul Schliwa-Bertling, Ericsson Research Network, Architecture and Protocols (NAP), Sweden
  • Magnus Stattin, Ericsson Research Network, Architecture and Protocols (NAP), Sweden

Abstract: In this tutorial the authors explain the fundamentals of the 5th Generation (5G) New Radio (NR) protocols and architecture, recently standardized by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP). The focus of the tutorial is on the higher layer protocols (i.e. almost everything on the radio network, except the physical layer). More emphasis will be given to the Radio Resource Control (RRC) protocol, which is the protocol responsible for fundamental functions in the user equipment (UE) such as state model (e.g. IDLE, CONNECTED, INACTIVE states), connection control procedures (e.g. state transitions like IDLE to CONNECTED, INACTIVE to CONNECTED, etc.), measurement configuration and reporting (different types of measurements the UE performs, impact due to beamforming, etc.), mobility, dual connectivity with 4G (first version of the 5G standard), etc.

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T10. A Communications Theory Perspective on Web Privacy

Presenters:

  • Elza Erkip, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New York University, USA
  • Siddharth Garg, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New York University, USA
  • Farhad Shirani Chaharsooghi, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New York University, USA

Abstract: In this tutorial, we provide a new framework for the study of fundamental limits of web privacy and investigate the design and analysis of practical deanonymization attacks in social networks and database systems. This framework brings together tools from communications theory, information theory, large deviations theory and probability and puts forth a systematic technique for deriving theoretical guarantees for web privacy in several scenarios of interest such as online fingerprinting attacks, social network graph matching attacks, and database matching attacks, among others.

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T11. Spectrum Management and Sharing for Future Wireless Networks: Dynamic Radio Spectrum Access as a Service

Presenters:

  • Keivan Navaie, Lancaster University, UK
  • Hamid Aghvami, King’s College London, UK

Abstract: In this tutorial we introduce concepts and methods for providing spectrum-access-as-a-service (SaaS) to coexisting wireless systems utilizing the same radio spectrum each with different connectivity requirements. We then present a multi-objective optimization framework to investigate the fundamental performance bounds in a fully dynamic SaaS system. Various system architectures based on full/partial virtualisation are then investigated and their performances are compared. We then look at the SaaS as a digital ecosystem and an innovation framework where we discuss its horizontal scalability and self-organization behaviour as well as its resiliency, robustness, utility and pricing. SaaS-based techniques are then discussed for providing connectivity to mission critical autonomous objects such as autonomous vehicles and robots. Applications of data science and machine learning in future planning of such systems are also explained. We then present several use-cases followed by conclusions and discussions on the challenges and open problems in service oriented provisioning of radio spectrum.

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T12. Signal Processing and Optimization Techniques for Ultra Reliable Low Latency Communications (URLLC)

Presenters:

  • Eduard Jorswieck, TU Dresden, Germany
  • Muhammad Imran; University of Glasgow, UK
  • Majid Butt, Nokia Bell Labs, France

Abstract: 5G is expected to support Ultra Reliable Low Latency Communications (URLLC) based services, such as industrial control, remote surgery, tactile internet, etc. These are also the most challenging services to implement because they require a new network design and control methodology, in order to satisfy their requirements and enable their co-existence with other types of services that 5G and beyond systems need to deliver. Indeed, today as we enter the Phase 3 of 5G design, it is imperative not only to understand how to deliver URLLC services but also to ensure that they will be offered in a sustainable fashion (i.e., not draining all network resources) that is compatible with the already provided enhanced Mobile Broadband (eMBB) services. The proposed tutorial addresses the signal processing and optimization aspects of URLLC for 5G and beyond networks. The tutorial will cover a novel system design framework, state of the art signal processing and optimization techniques; and introduce cross disciplinary methodology to discuss complex trade-offs in 5G and beyond networks in view of URLLC.

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